Browsing Tag

Words

Bless Your Heart by Cindy Colley

What I’m Reading…

…and I’m so excited about this book! I’m three chapters in and I already know it’s going to make me better and  stronger for the battle I constantly fight, and often lose, with the devil, over how I use my tongue.  Oh, so many times in my life, my dragon has come unleashed. One of my biggest regrets, in fact, is a day a couple of years ago when I was coming off a few sleepless nights, a family funeral, and a medicine that was affecting me in some negative ways, when my dragon came unleashed and breathed its fire at Celine Sparks, this book’s author. So many times, when things like this happen, you can ask forgiveness till the cows come home (or the dragon takes a nap), you can be assured it’s been given, but you will still be filled with regret. If only we could be prepared BEFORE the dragon awakes…BEFORE those days when we have so many excuses (That’s right…excuses) to set on fire the course of nature, as James said it.

That’s why I’m loving this book. It’s full of tools to help me be the dragon tamer I want to be. It’s Biblical in a way that forces me to confront the dragon–to realize His mighty destructive nature–and to do practical things to recognize, at the right moments, how to keep him from ruining relationships, especially the relationship most precious: the one I have with my Father.

I can’t wait to finish. If I can do this one thing, I’ll will have arrived. I mean, if I can control my tongue, I can manage the rest of me. That’s what James said in 3:2. If I can just get the bridle in that dragon’s mouth…

If  you’re working on that bridle and leash, you could use this tool. There are many places to buy the book, but I’d order it directly from Celine by emailing her at sparksremarks@hotmail.com.

 

Bless Your Heart by Cindy Colley

Sister to Sister: Ironic Living

Funny thing happened to me on the way to the auditorium in one of my recent speaking engagements. On this particular day, there was a donut breakfast prior to the seminar. It was a pleasant fellowship brunch held in the lobby of the auditorium of this church building. Upon speaking to one of the elderly women, she rather scowled at me and said, “Whoever heard of having donuts and coffee in the lobby?… I just don’t approve of this at all!”

Well, she said it with a coffee cup in her hand, so I smiled and responded, “Well, perhaps you should put down your cup, then, if it bothers you.”

She said, “Well, it does bother me!”

I said, “Well, do you think it’s okay down the hall in the fellowship room, then, but it’s not okay in this room?”

“Just a minute,” she responded, “and I’ll tell you what I think.” She proceeded to scoot around the table to the coffee dispenser to refill her cup.

While her inconsistency was a little more blatant than most, it occurred to me that, in most of us, there may often be an unrecognized clash between what we say and what we do. Here’s a sampling. You may have heard similar statements.

“Mom, Jamie doesn’t bow her head when we are praying.”

“I just hate Sophie. She’s always bad-mouthing people.”

“Honey, I wish for once you would stop being so selfish and think about what I need from this relationship.”

“I know I need to get serious about this, but I just don’t have TIME to think much about ETERNITY.”

Facebook status: “It makes me sick how people on facebook are always so negative.”

“I always sit all by myself. Why doesn’t somebody come sit with me?”

…or my personal favorite… “I can write good. That’s always been my favorite subject. Can you tell me how I maybe could write a book?”

These are funny examples of ironic self incrimination. But, in a more serious vein, perhaps we should all taste our words to be sure we are not spewing forth like the fountain in James 2:

Doth a fountain send forth at the same place sweet water and bitter?
Can the fig tree, my brethren, bear olive berries? either a vine, figs? so can no fountain both yield salt water and fresh (James 2:12, 13).

And one final word from the One Who has the final word:

“…So practice and observe whatever they tell you—but not what they do. For they preach, but do not practice.
They tie up heavy burdens, hard to bear, and lay them on people’s shoulders, but they themselves are not willing to move them with their finger (Matthew 23:3,4).”