Browsing Tag

Mama’s K.I.S.S.

Bless Your Heart by Cindy Colley

Mama’s K.I.S.S. #55:–Translating for Missions

As you know, if you’ve been reading, for quite some time, I’ve occasionally been running little installments called “Mama’s K.I.S.S.” I know that lots of readers could give many more and far more creative ideas than I can offer, but these installments are just a few tried and true and mostly old-fashioned ideas for putting service hearts in our kids.  This is number 54 of a list of one hundred ways we train our kids to serve. K.I.S.S. is an acronym for “Kids In Service Suggestions”.

Have a student in a foreign language in your home or high school? While I know that second-year Spanish students are usually not able to translate lessons on the mission field, they are able to take the correspondences (letters and emails) sent by Spanish speaking missionaries and translate them for your eldership and/or missions committee. What a great way to accomplish a three-fold purpose. You can enhance the foreign language skills of your student while getting his/her “feet wet” in foreign missions while building relationships between elders in a church and young students. so go to your elders and volunteer your kids. Better yet, let your kids go to the elders and let them know they’d love to be in-house translators.

Additionally, if your congregation works with a correspondence evangelism program, this is also a great niche for your teens who are working on foreign language skills. Often the foreign students send Bible questions that are difficult for the Bible school workers to understand. Volunteering in such a program focuses malleable teen hearts on souls and promotes a zeal for evangelism that will last a lifetime.

I’ve seen more than one young translator end up doing great mission work on foreign soil. It’s one idea for preparing a heart to be a sower!

Bless Your Heart by Cindy Colley

Mama’s K.I.S.S. #54: Devos for Younger Kids

As you know, if you’ve been reading, for quite some time, I’ve occasionally been running little installments called “Mama’s K.I.S.S.” I know that lots of readers could give many more and far more creative ideas than I can offer, but these installments are just a few tried and true and mostly old-fashioned ideas for putting service hearts in our kids.  This is number 54 of a list of one hundred ways we train our kids to serve. K.I.S.S. is an acronym for “Kids In Service Suggestions”.

This one really doesn’t need an explanation. If your children are upwards of ten years old, then they can easily host a devotional for younger children. Of course, these younger children could be the children in your congregation or they could be community kids. Help your children plan a Bible theme, like “The Big Fish” (the book of Jonah) or “The Men Who Would Not Bow” (Daniel 3) or “When a Lame Man Walked”(Acts 3-4). Practice the storytelling and related songs with your kids. Make visuals or plan to use puppets to tell the story or help your kids dress up as Bible characters as they tell the story. Make sure your children are prepared to pray with the younger ones.

Make little invitations with your kids or have your kids invite the children personally.  Alternately, if you are inviting children from your congregation, your kids could write out the invitation and submit it to the one who is making public announcements or to whomever prepares the bulletin. It’s important to let the kids pick the theme (with help and advice) and do the legwork and artwork. It’s important to specify the ages of children who are invited on the invitation, as well. Having kids present,  who are older than the hosting kids, may intimidate the hosts, especially the first time around (and you really want this to be successful). On the other hand, having babies present (especially without moms) may also distract from your children’s ability to focus and complete their plans. Just think ahead and try to make the big day whopping success for your own children, by indicating, on the invitation, just who the devotional is targeting. It saves last minute angst. Then be loving and gracious when the day comes if there are hitches in your original plan. Remember, the goal is servant hearts in your kids, so, in every Mama’s K.I.S.S. activity you are, most importantly, modeling the behavior of the Lord.

As the time draws near, practice a game or activity with your kids– a Bible verse scavenger hunt or a sidewalk tic-tac-toe game where questions must be answered before the Xs and Os can be placed. It could be a treasure map locating theme-related favors or preparation of a Bible food. Any of these activities should be related to the devotional story your kids are telling and your activity should be something kids can complete within a thirty or forty minute time period.

Snacks and favors are optional, but your kids might love to make or buy story-related snacks. Pinterest is a great source for ideas.  Be sure, if you are hosting community kids, to include info about the church in any favor bags.

Just be sure to let your kids take ownership of this little event. Talk about young souls that are being influenced while you are preparing. Then have fun with this!

Bless Your Heart by Cindy Colley

Mama’s K.I.S.S. #53: Help a Homeschooling Mom

As you know, if you’ve been reading, for quite some time, I’ve occasionally been running little installments called “Mama’s K.I.S.S.” I know that lots of readers could give many more and far more creative ideas than I can offer, but these installments are just a few tried and true and mostly old-fashioned ideas for putting service hearts in our kids.  This is number 53 of a list of one hundred ways we train our kids to serve. K.I.S.S. is an acronym for “Kids In Service Suggestions”.

When our Hannah was about 12, she began tutoring a kindergartner who lived in our neighborhood. It was a big blessing for her and I think it was also a blessing for the family of little Lindsey, I was close by, just in case there were any issues that required an adult for any reason. Responsibility and service were great take-aways for Hannah. It was a hands-on prep for the school-teaching and home education that Hannah would be doing later in life, as well. Most of all, it gave Hannah some real-life experience in handling issues that required discipline and ethical choices.

There are home-schooling moms who can use a helper once a week. Why not have your teen approach one you know and offer their services as grocery store helpers, math tutors, piano teachers, once-a week casserole-makers or free Thursday backyard  babysitters for toddlers for an hour a week? It could be the beginning of a win-win situation for two families, as was the case in our neighborhood.

Bless Your Heart by Cindy Colley

Mama’s K.I.S.S. #52–Reverse Trick-or-Treating

As you know, if you’ve been reading, for quite some time, I’ve occasionally been running little installments called “Mama’s K.I.S.S.” I know that lots of readers could give many more and far more creative ideas than I can offer, but these installments are just a few tried and true and mostly old-fashioned ideas for putting service hearts in our kids.  This is number 52 of a list of one hundred ways we train our kids to serve. K.I.S.S. is an acronym for “Kids In Service Suggestions”. Wow! we are over halfway there!

There’s still time to do this one during this fun week! The masquerading holiday doesn’t have to be evil. Moms and Dads can have some control over the impact of holidays on their families, for sure. 

I believe Halloween is a great opportunity for widows and elderly Christians to bond with the children of the church. Our own children made “appointments” with elderly people in the church to come by and “show off” their costumes and we sometimes took treats to those elderly people (kind of backwards trick-or-treating). Anticipation and excitement emanated from the faces of those older saints. But more importantly, our kids grew, through this and other service projects to love these mature Christian people—a great blessing in the development of our children, for sure. 

If you have a shortage of elderly in the congregation, find a nursing home or retirement center. Include a note about the church or a tract about salvation in your goody bag. 

Have a fun and blessed week!

Bless Your Heart by Cindy Colley

Mama’s K.I.S.S. #51–Mentoring Younger Kids in Sports

As you know, if you’ve been reading, for quite some time, I’ve occasionally been running little installments called “Mama’s K.I.S.S.” I know that lots of readers could give many more and far more creative ideas than I can offer, but these installments are just a few tried and true and mostly old-fashioned ideas for putting service hearts in our kids.  This is number 50 of a list of one hundred ways we train our kids to serve. K.I.S.S. is an acronym for “Kids In Service Suggestions”.

It’s easy (and fun) for us to become very involved in the sports activities of our children. This is not wrong. It’s commendable, even necessary, for us to be involved if our children are pursuing goals that could bring acclaim on some level in various sports arenas. The big deal about sports is that they can’t be the big deal in our lives and families. The biggest deal has to be Jesus and his church, of course (Matthew 6:33). So Wednesday night ballgames are preempted by Bible class, Sunday tourneys by worship, and team arrogance cannot characterize our children. There are all kinds of lessons to be learned on the diamond, the court and the field. But it takes a never ending zeal for teaching them on the part of parents. I should say that I know a host of parents right now who are characterized by this zeal. Uniforms on church pews, visitors at worship from ball teams, and Christian-dad-led devotionals on the field are just a few signs that this sort of zeal is alive and well.

But what if those teens who are athletically bent carried it one step further and  actually invited younger  kids over for a devo and a pick-up basketball game, or for a youth singing followed by a field trip to the batting cage? What if the guy who is the expert on the rowing team, invited the younger ones out on the river for a day in the canoe, along with a spiritual time together on the bank somewhere? Maybe the girl who is the star high-school basketball player could invite the younger ones to a game followed by a sundae supper at her home, and a talk about standing out for him when we are in the lime-light. This is, of course, not an exhaustive suggestion list, but you can see where your little all-stars can go with this. Even if your athletes are ten years old, they can be doing this for those who are six and seven, with a little transportation help from you! What if your twelve-year-old invited his entire team to go to a night of VBS with him followed by a coaching session around your home basketball goal by one of your congregation’s “pros”? A good “pro” is pretty easy to find when he’d be coaching twelve-year-olds; and think of the life-coaching he could be doing at the same time!

It’s easy to be overwhelmed with sports and edge out the Lord. But it’s better to be overwhelmed by His goodness and let sports be the catalyst for sharing that bounty. That’s all-star evangelism.

Bless Your Heart by Cindy Colley

Mama’s K.I.S.S. #50–“Would You Like to Study?”

As you know, if you’ve been reading, for quite some time, I’ve occasionally been running little installments called “Mama’s K.I.S.S.” I know that lots of readers could give many more and far more creative ideas than I can offer, but these installments are just a few tried and true and mostly old-fashioned ideas for putting service hearts in our kids.  This is number 50 of a list of one hundred ways we train our kids to serve. K.I.S.S. is an acronym for “Kids In Service Suggestions”. Wow! we are halfway there!

This is our current “Would you like to study?” card. It’s what I give to the cashier or the attendant or the nurse or the person beside me in waiting rooms or trains. It’s what I put in a book for a person I’ve met in my dad’s rehab or at his favorite restaurant, Waffle House. It’s just a handy little tool that almost always goes along with the verbal question “If you’d ever like to study the Bible, I’m all about that!”

It’s ten times more precious to most people, though, if you’ve trained your child to hand these to people with whom you are conversing or doing business. It’s a boost for an adult to have a young child look her squarely in the eyes and say “We love to study the Bible. Do you want to study with us?”  Children are braver, more persuasive and thousands times cuter.

The big bonus is you’re growing brave evangelistic adults. If your child waits till age 30 and decides to try and become evangelistic in a Fishers of Men class or a a visitation team, he can be very successful for the next forty or fifty years. But twenty-five valuable years of evangelism training has already bypassed him. Likely some soul that could have been reached has been hurled into eternity unprepared. Maybe most tragic is the fact that the bravery for adult evangelism has not been planted, cultivated, and developed. It’s just harder to start evangelizing when you’ve let the pressure to conform to societal “norms”, the bashfulness, and the awkward “feeling” that’s born of the devil be nurtured and developed, while the challenge of boldness and love for souls has been lying dormant.

So make a card. You can do it at https://www.123print.com or at https://www.vistaprint.com.

(Put your phone number in the slot that’s blackened on this sample. I’m good with all evangelism contacts having my number…but maybe not the whole world. =))